All posts tagged: books

Mia’s Library: Sorcerer To The Crown, The Fifth Season

This is a fantasy edition of Mia’s Library, which should surprise none of you as it’s my favourite genre. I know there exists a great deal of literary sniffiness about fantasy- it’s too often considered low-brow or unchallenging- but that’s a nonsense. Good fantasy is more than just dragons and escapism- it’s literature that happens to be fun as well as evocative. One criticism I will accept of  mainstream fantasy however is the fetishisation of Middle Age/swords and knights/Anglo Saxon themes. Time was, you could count on a fantasy novel to be full of white guys with swords, and to only mention people of colour as some sort of evil or impossibly exotic race with next to no ‘screen time’. That’s changing, happily, and here are two excellent, mold-breaking fantasy novels that deserve to be on your shelf. 1:Sorcerer To The Crown by Zen Cho I kind of hate Zen Cho because she’s written the book I’d like to have written. Marrying Regency England with magic, this book is best described as a  combination of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell and …

Mia’s Library: The Wideacre Trilogy and The Girl With All The Gifts

Sick as a dog all weekend, I managed to exceed my own PB for books read in a 48 hour period. Of that number, (11!) here are 4 I think you should add to your library. 1-3: The Wideacre Trilogy by Philippa Gregory. Book 1: Wideacre , Book 2: The Favoured Child, Book 3: Meridon These books are not new, and as such may already be familiar to some of you- I am sorry to be so late to the party. I however found them at the perfect time- they took me to a wonderfully juxtaposed world of pre-Industrial England, with attendant bucolic beauty, and intensely drawn malice, evil and madness. Wideacre is both the title of the first book and the focus of all three tales- a beautiful estate in Sussex owned by the ancient Lacey family. You meet Beatrice in book 1, a happy, headstrong, clever child so full of love for her father, the Squire, and Wideacre that she feels an almost metaphysical connection to home. Beatrice’s gender however works against her- …